LINCOLN HEIGHTS
Street Names
When a developer files a tract map with the county, streets are named.
When Southern California was just starting out, street names were chosen to reflect the developer, his family,
or many prominent leaders had their names handed down to posterity on thoroughfares,
by laying out new tracts and donate to the city the streets or by selling it for $1.00.

Dr. John S. Griffin and his nephew Hancock Johnston planned the laying-out of East Los Angeles.
Streets, Avenues, and Parks were all born in the two men's brains. They sold the land little by little,
presented Eastside Park to the city. So were sheep had wandered over the ranch of the
Rosa Castilla, arose thickly settled East Los Angeles.

STREET
NAMED AFTER
ORIGIN
NORTH BROADWAY
Was DOWNEY AVE.
From the LA river to Mission Rd.
Renamed in 1910

Also the current
DOWNEY AVE.


John Gately Downey
1827-1894
An Irish Catholic pharmacist who had served as the 7th governor of California from 1860 to 1862; CA state assembly 1856-67,  Lieutenant Governor 1860. In 1868 establishes the first bank in Los Angeles.  He helped build the economic foundation of Southern California, effecting a transition from open cattle range to an agricultural district of small farms. In 1874 Downey Ave. was a 100 foot long street bisecting Lincoln Heights and had interests in many suburban tracts in East Los Angeles. Since almost all horse car and cable lines were conceived to promote land development his partner John Griffin began running a used omnibus along Downey Ave. to promote local home sites. Original interment at Old Calvary Cemetery which no longer exists. (Cathedral High School now sits atop the cemetery). Re-interment: Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma, San Mateo County, CA.

Dr. Griffin's sister married Albert Sidney Johnston. (See Hancock and Johnston Streets).

GRIFFIN AVE.

Dr. John S. Griffin
(1816-1898)
John S. Griffin

"Father of East Los Angeles"....."Pasadena once his pasture"

** Dr. John S. (Strother) Griffin was a native of Virginia -- he went to school at University of PA , then joined US Army as surgeon (and came to California in 1846 with General Kearney). In addition to his brother-in-law being Confederate General Albert Sydney Johnston, the #2 ranking general in 1862 (ahead of even Robert E. Lee at that time), Griffin's uncle was William Clark (of Lewis and Clark).  On the Strother side Griffin was also related to General (later Pres.) Zachary Taylor, and thus to Jefferson Davis (whose first wife was Taylor's daughter, Sarah).  Through Strothers he was also related to Pres. John Tyler. 

Created the first East Los Angeles "suburb", now known as Lincoln Heights. In 1863, he purchased 2,000 acres of ranch land for $1,000 and in 1870, Griffin and his nephew, Hancock Johnston, built homes there. In late 1874, they offered an additional 35 acres for sale, subdivided into 65 by 165 foot lots for $150 each. County Coroner (1862-1865).
Griffin was also a surgeon for Brigadier General S. W. Kearny's command on its march to California in 1846, a veteran of the Mexican War. Griffin became one of California's outstanding medical men.  He was one of the three pioneer physicians in the pueblo of Los Angeles.

In 1852, two years after California was admitted as a state to the Union, Garfias built an adobe hacienda on the east bank of the Arroyo, where he and his family proceeded to live in grand style, until he could not meet the interest payment due on a loan. Title to the land was then transferred in 1859 to his lenders, Dr. John S. Griffin and Benjamin "Don Benito" Wilson. Portions of the Rancho San Pasqual were thereafter sold, leaving Griffin and Wilson with 5,328 acres in 1873. In 1873 Wilson sold his portion to a real estate development association, which subdivided the land and named the community "Pasadena". 
 

HANCOCK ST.
AND
JOHNSTON ST.
Hancock McClung Johnston
1847 - 1904
Was a member of a prominent Southern family and long resident of East Los Angeles. Where streets bear both his family and given names.
Hancock Johnston was born in December, 1847 at China Grove Plantation, Brazoria county Texas, and was a member of one of the prominent southern families. He had resided in Los Angeles for many years, and leaves a widow and three sons.
He had extensive interests on the East Side, and two of the principal streets of that part of the city, Hancock St. and Johnston St., were named in his honor. (LA Times, Sep. 13, 1904)

Johnston Funeral:
The funeral of Hancock Johnston who was a pioneer of East Los Angeles, was conducted yesterday (9/14/1904) afternoon, services being held at the family residence, No. 2913 Downey Ave., (North Broadway) there was a large attendance, many of the early families of the city being represented. The interment was at Evergreen Cemetery.
He was the second son of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, the Confederate leader, and was born at China Grove Plantation. When he was 16 the family moved to San Francisco. He served a position on a newspaper, and later held responsible places in various mining concerns in CA and Nev. While at the New Almaden quicksilver mines he was terribly salivated, which was the primary cause of his final illness.
Mr. Johnston came to Los angeles in 1870 and was married to Miss Mary Eaton, daughter of Hon. B.S. Eaton. There were five children.
Large tracts of land were platted into lots by Mr. Johnston from his holdings east of the Los Angeles River, and on these sprang up what is now East Side. He built the second street railway in LA to give access to his properties. He was also extensively engaged in the raising of fine horses.
In 1902 Mr. Johnston was stricken with articular rheumatism, and was an invalid from that time until death released him from intense sufferings last Monday. (LA Times, Sep. 15, 1904)
LACY ST.

William Lacy
His home was located at the corner of N. Broadway & Sichel St.
He owned Pacific Clay Products Company. The company's early products were focused on supporting California's building boom of the 1920s, including brick, roofing tile, and terra cotta. During the Depression, Lacy entered the new market for colored table and kitchen wares. Alas, the Second World War brought end to the Pacific Clay Products Company's promising pottery production as the company contracted with the government and turned its production toward military production. Now today Pacific Pottery are valuable collector items.

OR
(Most likely this would be the Lacy Street St. origin)

William Lacy founder and CEO of Lacy Pipe & Manufacturing and Puente Oil Company.

LACY MANUFACTURING CO.  ON AVE. 23

At 60 years old he was considered to be in good health. He had sailed, only three weeks earlier, to Baja California aboard his 73 ft. yacht, the Penolope.  P.L. Larson was captain of the Penolope. The year was 1897. William Lacy was born in London England in 1837. He was the 5th son of a prosperous businessman. Educated as an architect, he immigrated to the USA in 1860 with his brothers. The brothers first settled in central Illinois where William married. By 1863 he'd had enough of Illinois and the Civil War so he took his wife and infant daughter and headed to California via Panama. He first settled in the San Francisco area where he was successful in business and Real Estate development. He was living in San Diego when he received his American citizenship in 1873. By 1875 William was both designing and organizing banks in Los Angeles. One of which went on to become the First National Bank of  Los Angeles. He was very active in the community serving on school boards and fire boards. By 1886 he was one of the most successful businessmen in L.A. having helped establish the second oil field in southern California.  By all standards he was the epitome of the successful capitalist businessman. 
So what  was he doing in Baja? He was doing what every successful American business man of his time was doing, exploiting the labor and land of less fortunate persons. It is not known when William acquired his holdings in Baja. There he had at least one gold mine and an ore mill. His son Ed also had a mine there. He started serious development on this property only two years before his death. What caused his death remains a mystery. His death was officially attributed to complications from appendicitis but some family members suspected foul play. After his son Ed returned home another son was to have gone to retrieve the body but it never happened. His body remains in a restored grave at the mill site near Punta Final.
Source: Robert Kinson: Searching for Lost Relatives, 5/31/02
LINCOLN PARK AVE.
Renamed to reflect the changed from
Eastlake Park to Lincoln Park. 1917?
Formally Pritchard
James A. Pritchard
This grand street was the "red carpet" leading to the main entrance to Lincoln Park in its day. Over a hundred years ago Lincoln Heights was the city limit and people crossed bridges by foot, horse, trolley, etc. over the LA river down N. Broadway and turned S. on Lincoln Park Ave. Noticed the old light fixtures on the sidewalks?

James A. Pritchard was one of the directors of the Los Angeles Independence Railroad Company which was responsible for the first train between Los Angeles and Santa Monica in 1875.

SICHEL ST.
Philip Sichel
One of the original Jewish settlers, served on the City Council and as a Los Angeles County Supervisor in 1864-1865. In 1866 the Anaheim Cemetery, the oldest public cemetery in Orange County was founded by purchasing a plot of land from Philip Sichel. 
SELIG PL.

William N. Selig
(1864-1948)
In 1913, he purchased 32 acres of land next to Eastlake Park (now known as Lincoln Park) at a reported cost of $1 million. The property was turned into a zoo for the animals that he used in his films. By 1915, 700 animal species were residing at the Selig Zoo.
VALLEY BLVD.
?
Formally Alhambra Ave. from  Downtown to the San Gabriel Valley? ca. 1894
WORKMAN ST.

William Henry Workman
(1839-1918)
Mayor of Los Angeles, 1886-88. City council (1872-1874; 1875-1880).
He made his great mark in two areas of LA politics and the development of its infrastructure, had Fort (Broadway), Spring, Hill, and Main streets paved. During his term on the Park Commission, he donated two thirds of his land for Hollenbeck Park. When he took the hand of Maria Elizabeth Boyle (1847-1933) in 1867, two distinguished Los Angeles families were joined. Maria, of course, came from the family which had bought property now known as Boyle Heights before William Workman's acquisitions there. Interment at Evergreen Cemetery.
CLOVER ST.
Native Irish Plant
Possibly from the large clover field there. Clover fields and wild mustard grew rampantly at that time.
EASTLAKE AVE.
Eastlake Park
before 1917

Charles Locke Eastlake
(1836-1906)
Eastlake style period from 1870 to 1890.
English museologist and writer on art who gave his name to a 19th-century furniture style.
Eastlake was a popular decorative style of ornamentation found on houses of various other styles, e.g. Victorian Gothic, Stick Style, and Queen Anne. 
If you have a chance to visit one of these early houses, carefully look at the door knobs, hinges, latches, or the hardware. This style would be called Eastlake. They are beautiful and expensive collectibles by themselves.
BARBEE ST.
Theodore F. Barbee
On July 28, 1876 formed a stock company "Absentine Artificial Stone Manufacturing Company" located in East Los Angeles with other partners. Also a large real estate holder.
MOULTON AVE.
Elijah Moulton
1820-?
An East Los Angeles dairyman and born in Canada in 1820. He arrived in Los Angeles in 1845 and met John C. Fremont and was offered $25 a month to accompany him on an expedition up the coast. Was the first deputy sheriff of Los Angeles and was marshal of the city and a member of the city council in 1860-61. Responsible for the construction of the 1861 footbridge joining central and east Los Angeles. He resided on the eastside of the LA river, below the Downey Avenue viaduct.  Involved in a real estate transaction at N. Main St. and Moulton Ave.
MESNAGER ST.
George Le Mesnager
An early French immigrant to Los Angeles in the 1870s. He established vineyards in the Crescenta Valley (above Glendale) soon thereafter, and built his winery near downtown LA, between "the cornfield" and the river, just off N. Spring St. He was a leader of the large French population in Los Angeles, and was considered a French patriot, interrupting his stay in the U.S. to return to France to fight in the Franco-Prussian War and WW1. The winery was named "Old Hermitage",  and operated from the 1880s until Prohibition. 
MAIN ST. NORTH
Formally Kuhrts
From the L.A. River
to Mission Rd.

Jacob Kuhrts
"Uncle Jake"
Born in Germany and was a sailor. Came to Los Angeles and became a Grocer, County Coroner (1870-1873), Fire Chief (1880-1883), City's first Fire Commissioner (1886-1900), and Councilman (1876-77,80). Also a member of the "Thirty-Eights", the first group of volunteer firefighters in 1869. In 1886 the Jacob Kuhrts Engine Company 3 is established.
GATES ST.
Byrant Gates
Was a major sheep owner in Los Angeles with about 5,400 heads of sheep. ~ 1879
THOMAS ST.
Milton Thomas
Was a member of the Southern California Horticultural Society. ~ 1877. Also a large real estate holder.
LAMBIE ST.
William Thomas Lambie
1837-1900
Member of the city council 1883-84,1886-87, City Surveyor/Engineer 1887-88. 
Born in Williamsport Maryland and self educated. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army and served throughout the war under the command of Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson. Came to CA in 1869 and worked as an engineer for the Central/Southern Pacific Railroads, in charge of the construction of the Newhall Tunnel in 1876. After retiring from public office Mr. Lambie in a private business died in 1900 as a result of injuries sustained in an earth slide during the construction of the Third St. Tunnel. 
"Close enough to Lincoln Heights to mention" j.a.
HOLGATE SQUARE
Mr. & Mrs. Holgate
Mr. William Holgate (d. 1939) and Mrs. Mary Holgate (1859-1954) came to Los Angeles in 1887. They purchased land in 1893 and built their home at 2330 Holgate Square. Mr. Holgate was a real estate agent and insurance broker. (LA Times Nov. 11, 1954)
AVENUE 18
Was
WATER ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 19
Was
HAYES ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 20
Was
WALNUT ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street.  (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 21
Was
CHESTNUT ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 22
Was
TRUMAN ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street.  (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 23
Was
LECOUVREUR ST.


Frank Lecouvreur
(1829-1901)

Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street.  (LA Times 2/21/1897)

-----

Frank Lecouvreur was born Franz Lecouvreur in Ortlesburg, Prussia. Educated as an engineer, he left home for California in 1851. In 1855, Lecouvreur moves to Southern California, and scattered diary entries cover his service as Los Angeles county clerk and deputy county surveyor and businessman, 1855-1868.

AVENUE 24
Was
HELLMAN ST.


Isaias William Hellman
(1842-1920)

Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street .(LA Times 2/21/1897)

-----

Isaias W. Hellman was a German-Jewish banker and philanthropist, and a founding father of The University of Southern California.

Came to the US in 1859; He arrived in L.A. in 1859 and began work as dry goods clerk; manager and president, Hellman, Temple and Co., bankers, 1868-71; He began in banking at Los Angeles in 1868 and founded the Farmers and Merchants Bank in 1871 and was its president from 1876-1920,: In 1890, he moved to San Francisco and he incorporated the Union Trust Company, the first trust company in California.
 

AVENUE 25
Was
HAMILTON PL.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 26
Was
WELL ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 27
Was
HOFF ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 28
Was
PRIMROSE ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 29
Was
KOSTER ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 30
 Was
JACKSON ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 31
Was
SIGLER ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 32
Was
GRANDIN ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 33
Was
LACY ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 34
Was
HOLBORN ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
AVENUE 35
Was
SWAIN ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
MANITOU ST.
Was
HAWKINS ST.
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)
MANUELA ST.
Was
POMONA ST
Renamed in 1897 to remove duplicate or to constitute the same name throughout the entire length of the street. (LA Times 2/21/1897)

** Submitted by L. Strawther.
*** Correction by "Smith, Nick" City of Pasadena.
 
 

Tract names in Lincoln Heights
Source: City of Los Angeles website.
I think I have about 90% of the tract names, some names were hard to read from the maps.
  • EAST LOS ANGELES TRACT
  • STEARNS SUB-DIVISION OF A PORTION OF THE CHAVEZ TRACT
  • CHAVEZ TRACT
  • DOULLARD TRACT
  • H.T. HAZARD'S SUB-DIVISION OF GRIFFIN'S ADDITION TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • HANLEY'S RE-PLAT TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • T.S. PALMER'S SUB-DIVISION OF EAST LOS ANGELES
  • EMBODY AND LACY'S SUB-DIVISION OF EAST LOS ANGELES
  • NEWARF TRACT
  • JOHNSTON ST. TRACT
  • MOULTON'S ADDITION
  • HANCOCK ST. TRACT
  • TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT EAST LOS ANGELES
  • DICKENSON'S SUBDIVISION OF MOULTON'S TRACT
  • TRANSIT TRACT
  • BRETT TRACT
  • C. HARTWELL'S SUB-DIVSION OF GRIFFIN'S ADDITION TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • GRIFFIN AVE. TRACT / GRIFFIN'S ADDITIONS TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT SUB-DIVISION OF GRIFFIN'S ADDITION TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • SAFFORD'S ADDITION OF THE BRADBURY BLOCK
  • BARKER TRACT
  • W.R. BECKETT'S TRACT
  • WM. LACY'S SUB-DIVISION OF EAST LOS ANGELES
  • ALTURA VIEW TRACT
  • VIGNES TRACT
  • PRITCHARD TRACT
  • ALEXANDER TRACT
  • BRET AND ARNOLD TRACT
  • PETTER TRACT
  • SALEM TRACT
  • MYER'S TRACT
  • BALDWIN ST. TRACT
  • BUSSELL'S SUB-DIVISION OF THE TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT
  • MARCUS AND ? OF THE TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT
  • A.E. TANDY TRACT
  • SAZ AND STEDOOM TRACT
  • EALES SUB-DIVISION OF THE TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT
  • S. WHITE'S SUB-DIVISION OF THE TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT
  • STURGES SUB-DIVISION
  • WESTON'S TRACT
  • PARK TRACT
  • POINDEXTOR'S SUB-DIVISION OF THE TERMINUS HOMESTEAD TRACT
  • THE HARTHORN TRACT
  • J.G. WHITTAKER TRACT
  • R.M. MARTIN TRACT
  • MOUNT OLYMPUS TRACT
  • CHULA VISTA TRACT
  • V. PONET'S SUB-DIVISION OF GRIFFIN'S ADDITION TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • STOCKWELL'S SUB-DIVISION OF GRIFFIN'S TRACT EAST LOS ANGELES
  • DUNWAY TRACT
  • JACOBUS TRACT
  • BEACH'S SUB-DIVISION OF GRIFFIN'S ADDITION TO EAST LOS ANGELES
  • HAMILTON SUB-DIVISION
  • HAYDEN ST. TRACT
  • FLANNAGAN ORANGE SLOPE TRACT
  • CHAMPANE TRACT
  • PRINCE TRACT : In 1905 Harbert and Buttersworth placed on the market 117 lots located on the Southwest corner of North Broadway and Mission Road of 50 by 120/175 feet and sold them from $150 to $400 per lot. (LA Times April 9, 1905)
  • HALL's TRACT : Mrs. Hall's Tract, on the east side of Griffin Avenue bounded by Altura  on the south, Johnson on the east, and Avenue 28 (roughly) on the north was subdivided ca. 1881 by Mrs. Elmira Hall, short after the death of her husband, Dr. Luther Hall. She hired the LA architectural firm of Kysor & Morgan to design a large two-story house for her and her four children on the property worth $5,000 -- quite a sum in those days. This is the 17-room house at 330 N. Griffin Avenue (the original address) that was donated to the Salvation Army in 1898 for use as a rescue home for fallen women. It was officially dedicated for that purpose in January 1899. Later known as the Booth Maternity Group Home for Unwed Mothers, it was closed by the Salvation Army at the end of 1993. 

  • Mrs. Hall donated the house to the Salvation Army because her daughter Gertrude, who married Edmond J. Clinton in 1895, was a Salvation Army member who eventually reached the rank of captain. Gertrude and Ed were the parents of Clifford Clinton, who founded Clifton's Cafeterias. Gertrude also was a good friend of Agnes and Lavinia Jacobus, who grew up across the street in the house built in 1883 by their mother, Sarah E. Jacobus (my great-great grandmother). Like Mrs. Hall, she was a widow who subdivided her acreage and sold the lots to support her family (the Jacobus Tract, on the west side of Griffin bounded by Altura, Sichel and Avenue 28, was subdivided in 1884.) The Jacobus house was torn down in the 1960s to make way for a large apartment building, but the Kennedy house at the corner of Griffin and Avenue 28 (built in 1895 by another set of great-great grandparents) and the Jacobus house at 2619 Griffin, built in 1904 by my great-grandparents, are still standing. 
    By Jim Tranquada 4/30/06

If you have any info on the people behind other street names
or corrections!
Please email me

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